Nuvo

I, Roommate: The Robot Housekeeper Arrives – New York Times.

“WHEN my home robot arrived last month, its smiling inventors removed it from its box and laid it on its back on my living room floor. They leaned over and spoke to it, as one might to a sleeping child.

It straightened, let out a little beep, lighted up, looked left and right, and then, amazingly, stood and faced me.

I said, “Nuvo, how are you?”

It tilted to the left, and raised one arm to greet me. It shook my hand and winked with one of the lights in its little head. My life hasn’t really been the same since.”

Why can’t game characters do that? A lot of the tough stuff is a lot easier in the virtual space.

(Via, ah, that one site, name is on the tip of my tongue… or was it that other one?)

Comments 6

  1. Jamie Fristrom wrote:

    Videogame characters do do that. The Sims. I frequently attribute emotion to Sims characters that isn’t really there.

    Posted 18 Jul 2005 at 7:23
  2. Jurie Horneman wrote:

    OK, you’re right. It just seems to me a lot of effort is spent on making photo-realistic shaders for humans, and little on making memorable characters with engaging personalities and simple, but effective reactions. (Cue ‘Understanding Comics’ and the uncanny valley.)

    Reading the article made me think of Robo in Chrono Trigger.

    Posted 18 Jul 2005 at 9:20
  3. Lee Sheldon wrote:

    >> It just seems to me a lot of effort is spent on making photo-realistic shaders for humans, and little on making memorable characters with engaging personalities and simple, but effective reactions.

    The first is easy for people who make games to get their minds around. The second is rarely easy for anyone.

    Lee

    Posted 19 Jul 2005 at 16:41
  4. Lee Sheldon wrote:

    Also, that example is a dangerous one. Behavior and character are very different things.

    Lee

    Posted 19 Jul 2005 at 20:13
  5. Jurie Horneman wrote:

    Which example? Nuvo? The Sims? Robo?

    Isn’t behavior one of the primary ways of expressing character, outside of fiction?

    Posted 19 Jul 2005 at 20:26
  6. Lee Sheldon wrote:

    Nuvo. Character rises from… Heh, well read those chapters in the book!

    But basically, behavior can be nothing more than mimicry, and sometimes just anthropomorphism. Character is built from the sociological, psychological and physical dimensions of a personality.

    Posted 21 Jul 2005 at 15:31