Game censorship in China

Slashdot Games reports on Hearts of Iron, a World War 2 strategy game getting in trouble with Chinese authorities for (among other things):

“Manchuria”, “West Xinjiang”, and “Tibet” appeared as independent sovereign countries in the maps of the game. In addition, it even included China’s Taiwan province as the territory of Japan at the beginning of the game.

Hmmm…. according to this site Tibet was an independent sovereign country until 1950. But what really caught my eye was the fact that the Chinese Ministry of Culture has a Game Products Censorship Committee.

The committee regulates that online games with content violating basic principles of the Constitution, threatening China’s national unity, sovereignty and territorial integrity will be banned from importing.

Update: Massimo Curatella wrote in more detail about this over at Angelmax.com, linking to Xeni Jardin’s BoingBoing post which links to her Wired News article.

Comments 1

  1. Aubrey wrote:

    This has happened before in Korea, I believe. A historical strategy game by Microsoft (can’t remember which, sorry) depicted the western view of a particular battle, which did not agree with Korea’s scribed history. America’s foreign minister (or possibly Microsoft’s Korean manager) was apparantly held hostage until the history was re-written!

    I’m sorry I can’t remember details, but I’m just saying that this kind of thing has happened before.

    Posted 03 Jun 2004 at 23:23

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